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Tutorial: Five Styles of the Madison Vest

Niina Kivelä

Heidi Geren

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Adding welt pockets to the Madison vest is super simple. After sewing the shoulder seams of the vest, decide on your pocket placement. I made mine angled, but you could also make them parallel to the bottom of the vest. I figured out the placement of one pocket and then put the front vest pieces right sides together to mark where the pocket should go on the other side. I wanted to be sure they were exact mirror images. Then all you need to do is follow the simple welt pocket tutorial. When you're finished with the welt pockets, proceed with Madison as it is written in the tutorial. I can't wait to see all of your vests with pockets!

Amira Renee Miles

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Little Lizard King just released the Madison vest, and it is amazing! The options for the different animal ears are adorable and I love that it is designed with fun fabrics in mind. When creating my Madison vest I wanted to give it a little extra detail. I added a faux fur trim around the hood of my vest. I really think this extra detail made the vest super sweet and girly! If you want to add the trim too, it is super easy to do! 

Once you have your hood lining and main fabrics right side together you will sandwich the trim in between the two fabrics. You will want the trim to face towards the outside of the vest, away from the seam allowance, so when sewing this step place the trim facing the inside of the hood. This allows you to see that pretty trim once you sew the hood shut and turn it right side out!  At the base of the hood where the hood meets the shoulder of the vest you will want to angel or turn the trim inward towards the hood inner shell. This will enclose the raw edges of the trim. Once the hood is sewn shut you can choose to topstitch the edge of the hood. Then just finish the vest following the Madison tutorial! 

Jessica Dukes Vuaghn

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I purchased Ultra Suede fabric from Walmart which is super cute and super Cheap! Lol I started by grabbing my front and back pattern pieces. The back piece will be cut on the fold. I wanted the fringe look, so I measured from where the bottom of the pattern ends and then added 3 inches. The three inches added will be my fringe for front and back main pieces. Cut your strips up to the 3 inch mark. I cut the lining pieces and followed the pattern instructions. When it was time to hem the bottom, I folded the lining underneath about 1/2 inch and sewed to attach. 

Beth McKenzie Chastant

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When I saw this fleeced faux suede at Hobby Lobby I knew that I had to find a way to use it for the Madison Vest. “Pinspiration” struck and modifications were made! To create this unlined vest with exposed seams I first had to make alterations to the pattern. I simply cut away the seam allowance from the neckline, armscye, and the hem on both front and back bodice pattern pieces. I also trimmed the seam allowance from the front bodice pattern piece along the center. Since it is not lined you only need to cut 2 front bodice pieces and 1 back bodice piece (on the fold).

After all material is cut on my cutting mat, then, I placed my bodice pieces wrong side up on my cutting mat lining the side seams up on each side. Then I overlapped my front and back bodice pieces by moving my front piece over 3/4 inch, so the right side of the front piece will be touching the wrong side of the back piece. I pinned them together and flipped the vest over so the right side is facing up and sewed them at 1/4 inch along the edge of the side seam. Repeat for the other side. Afterward I sewed my shoulder seams together as normal with right sides together. To create a finished look as well as secure the fleece from eroding from the exposed edge I top stitched at 1/8 inch all of the way around the jacket from one end of the neckline down the front center across the hem and back up to where I started stitching. I also stitched around the armholes at 1/8 inch as well.

Niina Kivelä

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For Inseam Pockets use the Free Inseam Pocket pattern on the Little Lizard King Website. Follow the Madison Pattern tutorial and add the inseam pockets on the sides of the vest main fabric before closing the side seams. 

Adding the inseam pockets:

Cut 2 sets of pockets in mirror images. Finish all the edges of the pocket pieces either by using a zig zag stitch or serging the edges. 

Pin one pocket piece to vest front (main fabric only), right sides together on desired height. I used the size large pockets and measured 3 inches up for the bottom raw edge of the vest hem. Pin the pocket piece on desired place and sew to attach. 

Pin the mirror image pocket piece to the vest back, right sides together matching the distance from bottom raw edge. Sew to attach. Repeat on the other side. 

Line up the vest front and back side seams (main fabric) and pull the pockets out on the side. Pin around the pocket raw edges and up and down on the side seam. Sew to attach and repeat on the other side. Follow the Madison pattern tutorial to finish the vest. 

We had so much fun creating different looks for the Madison Vest and hope that you feel inspired to sew up different styles too! We would love to see pictures of your creations on the Little Lizard King Sewing Pattern Group over on Facebook.